The Social Justice Movement is Killing Hollywood

Hollywood is losing grasp of Americans because it has forgotten how it makes money: by entertaining them.

While I have mentioned previously that ratings for the Oscars continued to decline, Martin Armstrong brings up an important point about why that is the case:

The whole thing has become political and Hollywood has assumed its importance is far more than what its industry simply was – entertainment.

The 89th Academy Awards, however, reached nearly a new low in viewership. The industry that sees itself as being more of a politically correct role rather than entertainment elevating its position within society beyond arrogant, is in a serious bear market along with Football.

Armstrong concludes his post by writing:

Hollywood just may have shot-itself in the head with all this political posturing.

Indoctrination more important than entertainment

Meanwhile, social justice warriors continue to use media to indoctrinate Americans about their agendas, often with limited effect. For example, ABC’s When We Rise, a mini-series on the history of the LGBT movement, has continued to see ratings declines as the series has progressed:

Viewers are not rallying behind When We Rise.

The ABC miniseries chronicling the history of the LGBT rights movement fell almost 1 million viewers from its premiere, netting an audience of only 2.05 million Wednesday with a 0.6 demo rating, reports Variety. The show, created by Milk screenwriter Dustin Lance Black, pulled in 2.95 million viewers during its Monday premiere, which followed The Bachelor.

An Advocate writer was upset that even though 3 million people watched the opening episode of the “groundbreaking” miniseries, more people tuned in to watch sitcoms and police procedurals.

Furthermore, When We Rise is not the only LGBT show that is currently suffering:

Eyewitness, an acclaimed and groundbreaking crime thriller that centered on two gay youths who witness a murder, was axed by USA.

The series, directed by Adi Hasak and starring Julianne Nicholson, Tyler Young, and James Paxton (son of the late Bill Paxton), will not be returning for a second season after failing to find an audience, reports Variety. It averaged 639,000 viewers per episode.

Doubt, which made history as the first network television show to feature a trans actress (Laverne Cox) as a trans leading character, was also pulled by CBS Friday due to poor viewership.

However, Advocate’s Daniel Reynolds is more concerned about the political effects of the failures of these shows, rather than the fact that television networks aren’t creating shows that actually entertain audiences:

The string of cancellations is ill-timed for the LGBT community, which is rallying to “protect trans kids” this month in an upcoming Supreme Court battle. In a time when LGBT rights are under attack — and myths about queer lives still influence laws related to same-sex marriage, adoption, employment, bathroom access, and so-called conversion therapy — these depictions are vital to changing hearts and minds.

NPR’s decline

Although National Public Radio isn’t part of Hollywood per se, the recent prominence of social justice warriors on its network has led to similar effects:

Over the Christmas holidays I turned on my radio, and NPR was playing a story about a mother who was on a quest to let her young toddler become a transvestite.

I heard a similar story a year ago, and reacted with shock and anger. This time, I merely laughed.  Partly because I have become acclimated to hearing of such degeneracy, and partly because I can see so clearly how media is being used as a propaganda tool.

Sadly, this has thoroughly infected the American National Public Radio network, which used to be a good source of entertainment and information, free from commercial interests and able to explore unique ideas and topics without regard to their ability to sell advertising revenue. I can pinpoint exactly when this change began: 2004, and when it became overwhelming: 2016.

In 2004, longtime Morning Edition host Bob Edwards was fired because NPR wanted a “hipper” image. Max Roscoe notes that over the next decade, NPR would replace career “journalists with a passion for education and radio with millennial social justice warriors fresh out of college.”

Until recently, one could tune in to most any program, and expect to hear a professional host, well-trained by a speech coach, who is skilled at communicating an idea auditorially.  However, as the skin color, age, and sexual preference of the speaker became more important than their skills, standards have been thrown out the window and we have seen not only breaking of speech rules, but outright acceptance of poor speech patterns.

Today, it is fairly common to hear anti-family, socially disruptive stories on the network, and the degree of unprofessionalism and emotion on behalf of some of the younger female hosts is unbearable.

 

Reinforcing an already-negative trend

As technology has expanded the manner in which people can consume news and entertainment, traditional channels of communication have suffered.

Source: www.marketingcharts.com

Therefore, the last thing Hollywood should do is offer programs to audiences that don’t provide them with the entertainment they’re looking for. Otherwise, these trends will simply continue.

If I were a businessman, the last thing I would want to do is provide capital to an industry that not only has a declining customer base, but finds new and innovative ways of giving that base reasons to look elsewhere for their needs to be met.

Whether Hollywood gets a good dose of common sense before it dies remains to be seen. Before it does, however, it will have to confront the parasites accelerating its downfall.

 

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